Why might the title the lottery be considered ironic?

The idea of a lottery suggests taking part in a competition or game in which the winner receives a high-value or highly desirable prize. The title of Jacksons’s story is, therefore, ironic because, in her lottery, the winner does not receive a prize; she is, in fact, condemned to death.

Why might the title The Lottery or the opening description in paragraph one be considered ironic?

For example, why might the title, “The Lottery,” or the opening description in paragraph one, be considered ironic? Ans: The irony in the story is the name itself “The Lottery.” Winning the lottery turned out to be a bad thing. It could be considered ironic because the winner gets stoned to death.

What is ironic in The Lottery?

The plot as a whole in “The Lottery” is filled with ironic twists. The whole idea of a lottery is to win something, and the reader is led to believe that the winner will receive some prize, when in actuality they will be stoned to death by the rest of the villagers.

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How is The Lottery ironic in the story usually?

Usually a lottery winner is considered lucky, but the lottery winner in this story is put to death. Explanation: In this story, the irony lies in the negative nature of the lottery. … In this story, while the author employs many positive words and ideas, the winner of the lottery is actually put to death.

How is the title The Lottery an example of situational irony?

Since “situational irony” refers to any incongruity between what the audience reasonably expects and what actually happens, almost everything in “The Lottery” is ironic in this sense. The title suggests a game of chance with a prize—a game people enter voluntarily and a prize they want to win.

What are your preconceived notions of a lottery What is ironic about the name of the story?

Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” is a great short story. … The fact that the story is called “The Lottery” is ironic as the winner doesn’t win anything at all. Everyone has a preconceived idea that winning the lottery is a great thing and something that they want to happen to them.

How is the black box ironic in the lottery?

In “The Lottery,” Jackson says that the black box represents tradition, hence the villagers’ reluctance to replace it, despite its shabbiness. The box also implicitly symbolizes death. This symbolic aspect of the box, however, comes more from its function than its form. Its blackness symbolizes death.

What is the climax in the lottery?

In “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson, the climax is when Tessie is declared the “winner,” the falling action includes the townspeople gathering around her and stoning her, and the resolution is when the town’s life returns to normal.

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Why is the ending of the lottery so shocking?

Jackson defers the revelation of the lottery’s true purpose until the very end of the story, when “the winner,” Tess Hutchison, is stoned to death by friends and family. This shocking event marks a dramatic turning point in how we understand the story.

How is the lottery ironic in the story usually a lottery winner is considered lucky?

Usually a lottery winner is considered lucky, but the lottery winner in this story is put to death. The lottery winners in this story are considered lucky because they get to harvest corn, but they are already farmers.

What is the original purpose of the lottery?

The original purpose of the lottery seems to have been some twisted sort of rain dance ritual. As Old Man Warner explains, the old saying used to exclaim, “Lottery in June, corn be heavy soon” (line 122).

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