Why is the setting of the lottery unclear?

Most of the details of the setting are left intentionally vague for a very specific reason: Jackson wants to give the impression that this (surprisingly terrifying) story could have taken place anywhere in America at pretty much any time.

Why is the setting omitted in the lottery?

Why are these details of the setting omitted? She wants you to try and imagine what year this story takes place in. As you read you may think in the beginning that it could be in our time but as you read on and the language that she uses leads you to believe that the story takes place in a much earlier year.

What was the setting of the lottery?

The setting of Shirley Jackson’s short story “The Lottery” takes place in a small, nondescript town located in rural America on the morning of June 27th. Jackson describes the weather on the day of the lottery as being pleasant, clear, and warm, which gives the reader a sense of tranquility and optimism.

What is ironic about the setting in the story the lottery?

Terms in this set (4)

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The story takes place in a small village with a population around 300 people. The setting effects the story because the lottery and stoning will be quick. … Examples of irony in this story is Tessie is late for the Lottery and she is later is found to have the black slip.

How does the setting affect the lottery?

The setting evokes a pleasant mood. However, Jackson uses irony to create a surprise ending that leaves a lasting impact on a reader. While the setting and mood make the lottery seem like a happy occurrence, in reality, the opposite is true. The winner of the lottery is stoned to death by the townspeople.

Which family won the lottery?

In “The Lottery,” the family that draws the “winning” piece is the Hutchinson family, which includes Bill, his wife Tessie, and the children Dave, Nancy, and Bill Jr. The one who receives the final paper with the fatal black spot is Tessie Hutchinson.

What is the irony in the lottery?

The plot as a whole in “The Lottery” is filled with ironic twists. The whole idea of a lottery is to win something, and the reader is led to believe that the winner will receive some prize, when in actuality they will be stoned to death by the rest of the villagers.

What does the setting symbolize in The Lottery?

The setting of the story is important because it helps create the ironic tension between what the inhabitants should be like and how they actually are. The setting is a “modern” small town for Jackson’s time, with a traditional belief system.

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What is the conflict in The Lottery?

Person versus society is the major conflict in “The Lottery” because the conflict revolves around Tessie Hutchinson’s struggle against her town, the citizens of which insist on observing a ritual of sacrifice each year in blind adherence to tradition.

What is the climax in The Lottery?

In “The Lottery” by Shirley Jackson, the climax is when Tessie is declared the “winner,” the falling action includes the townspeople gathering around her and stoning her, and the resolution is when the town’s life returns to normal.

Why was Tessie Hutchinson singled out as the winner?

Tessie Hutchinson is singled out as the “winner” because she protested against the tradition of the lottery by saying “it isn’t fair.” As she protested, everyone even her own husband and three children joined in stoning her to death.

What’s the theme of the story?

The term theme can be defined as the underlying meaning of a story. It is the message the writer is trying to convey through the story. Often the theme of a story is a broad message about life. The theme of a story is important because a story’s theme is part of the reason why the author wrote the story.

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