Quick Answer: What’s the setting of the Lottery by Shirley Jackson?

The setting of “The Lottery” is, according to Shirley Jackson, her village of Bennington, Vermont: … In her story, Jackson’s village is a rural area, surrounded by other such villages with people who have lived narrow lives and, perhaps as a result of such lives, appear to have narrow minds, as well.

What is the setting of the lottery Why is it important?

The setting of the story is important because it helps create the ironic tension between what the inhabitants should be like and how they actually are. … The setting is a “modern” small town for Jackson’s time, with a traditional belief system.

When and where is the lottery set?

A short story set in Vermont during the 1940s; published in 1948. Members of a small town gather for the annual lottery, which seems like a festive event but is not. Its true purpose is revealed when Tessie Hurchinson draws the “winning” slip, and is stoned to death by her townspeople.

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How does the setting of the lottery help to form the story What does the setting add to the plot?

The story takes place in a small village with a population around 300 people. The setting effects the story because the lottery and stoning will be quick. The ways that the characters differentiated is some wish to see someone die and others do not believe in the lottery.

What does the setting symbolize in The Lottery?

The setting of the story is important because it helps create the ironic tension between what the inhabitants should be like and how they actually are. The setting is a “modern” small town for Jackson’s time, with a traditional belief system.

How does the setting affect The Lottery?

The setting evokes a pleasant mood. However, Jackson uses irony to create a surprise ending that leaves a lasting impact on a reader. While the setting and mood make the lottery seem like a happy occurrence, in reality, the opposite is true. The winner of the lottery is stoned to death by the townspeople.

How long did The Lottery take to write?

WRITING IT WAS A SNAP.

The writing came easily; Jackson dashed out the story in under two hours, making only “two minor corrections” when she read it later—“I felt strongly that I didn’t want to fuss with it”—and sent it to her agent the next day.

Who is the antagonist in The Lottery?

Tessie Hutchinson is the protagonist in “The Lottery”. The lottery itself is the antagonist.

What important preparation is made a night before The Lottery?

The night before the drawing the two men prepare slips for every household in the community–but not for every individual member of every household. The night before the lottery, Mr. Summers and Mr. Graves made up the slips of paper and put them in the box, and it was then taken to the safe of Mr.

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Why was Tessie Hutchinson singled out as the winner?

Tessie Hutchinson is singled out as the “winner” because she protested against the tradition of the lottery by saying “it isn’t fair.” As she protested, everyone even her own husband and three children joined in stoning her to death.

What is the plot of The Lottery?

The plot of “The Lottery” involves the selection of a lottery “winner” out of the residents of a small fictitious town. The “winner” will be sacrificed to ensure that the year’s crops are good.

What is the main conflict of The Lottery?

Person versus society is the major conflict in “The Lottery” because the conflict revolves around Tessie Hutchinson’s struggle against her town, the citizens of which insist on observing a ritual of sacrifice each year in blind adherence to tradition.

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