How does the setting of the lottery relate to the society?

The story takes place in a small village with a population around 300 people. The setting effects the story because the lottery and stoning will be quick. The ways that the characters differentiated is some wish to see someone die and others do not believe in the lottery. … The setting evokes a pleasant mood.

How does the lottery relate to society?

“The Lottery” relates to real life because it shows us how people can easily be repressed by the communities they inhabit. Most of us derive great strength and comfort from the communities in which we live. But too many people are repressed by the communities in which they live.

Why is the setting in the lottery important?

The setting in the beginning of The Lottery, by Shirley Jackson, creates a mood of peacefulness and tranquillity. The image portrayed by the author is that of a typical town on a normal summer day. … This is important to get the reader to focus on what a typical day it is in this small town.

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How is the theme of the lottery relevant in our society today?

The lottery in this story reflects an old tradition of sacrificing a scapegoat in order to encourage the growth of crops. … In today’s society we often have an all too-casual attitude toward misfortune; Jackson shows us this aspect of human nature through the town’s casual attitude toward the lottery.

What is the theme of the short story The Lottery?

The main themes in “The Lottery” are the vulnerability of the individual, the importance of questioning tradition, and the relationship between civilization and violence. The vulnerability of the individual: Given the structure of the annual lottery, each individual townsperson is defenseless against the larger group.

What is unjust about the society in The Lottery?

The unfair tradition of the Lottery by Shirley Jackson symbolizes a loss of humanity and an unstable society, afraid of facing the reality of the practices they partake in, so they continue to do so with no hesitation and mercy of their actions. … As soon as the lottery begins the Hutchinson family is selected. Mr.

What is the moral lesson in The Lottery?

In “The Lottery,” the moral lesson or theme is that one should not blindly follow traditions simply because they’re tradition.

What is the main setting of The Lottery?

The setting of “The Lottery” is, according to Shirley Jackson, her village of Bennington, Vermont: … In her story, Jackson’s village is a rural area, surrounded by other such villages with people who have lived narrow lives and, perhaps as a result of such lives, appear to have narrow minds, as well.

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How does the setting affect the plot of The Lottery?

The setting effects the story because the lottery and stoning will be quick. … The setting evokes a pleasant mood. However, Jackson uses irony to create a surprise ending that leaves a lasting impact on a reader. While the setting and mood make the lottery seem like a happy occurrence, in reality, the opposite is true.

How does the setting of The Lottery affect the story?

The setting evokes a pleasant mood. However, Jackson uses irony to create a surprise ending that leaves a lasting impact on a reader. While the setting and mood make the lottery seem like a happy occurrence, in reality, the opposite is true. The winner of the lottery is stoned to death by the townspeople.

Which quote from The Lottery best illustrates?

The correct answer and the quote that best illustrates the story’s that following tradition blindly can be hazarous is C. “Althought the villagers had forgotten the ritual and lost the original black box, they still remember to use stones.”

What does the black box symbolize in The Lottery?

The Black Box

The shabby black box represents both the tradition of the lottery and the illogic of the villagers’ loyalty to it. The black box is nearly falling apart, hardly even black anymore after years of use and storage, but the villagers are unwilling to replace it.

What is the irony in The Lottery?

The plot as a whole in “The Lottery” is filled with ironic twists. The whole idea of a lottery is to win something, and the reader is led to believe that the winner will receive some prize, when in actuality they will be stoned to death by the rest of the villagers.

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