What does the lottery mean to the townspeople in the story?

Answer: the lottery means in the towns people in the story is killing people by stoning them.. Explanation: in the story their tradition is killing people by stoning..

What does the lottery mean to the villagers?

The elaborate ritual of the lottery is designed so that all villagers have the same chance of becoming the victim—even children are at risk. Each year, someone new is chosen and killed, and no family is safe.

How do the townspeople feel about the lottery?

How do the townspeople view the lottery box? They are afraid of it. They all want to get rid of it. They see it as part of a tradition.

Why did the townspeople do the lottery?

The people are holding the lottery, not because they want it to produce something beneficial to the community, but because they are afraid of what might happen if they gave it up. They don’t want to test it.

What is the moral lesson in the lottery?

In “The Lottery,” the moral lesson or theme is that one should not blindly follow traditions simply because they’re tradition.

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What does the lottery symbolize?

The lottery represents any action, behavior, or idea that is passed down from one generation to the next that’s accepted and followed unquestioningly, no matter how illogical, bizarre, or cruel. The lottery has been taking place in the village for as long as anyone can remember.

What important preparation is made a night before the lottery?

The night before the drawing the two men prepare slips for every household in the community–but not for every individual member of every household. The night before the lottery, Mr. Summers and Mr. Graves made up the slips of paper and put them in the box, and it was then taken to the safe of Mr.

What attitude best describes how the townspeople feel after the lottery begins?

After the lottery begins, the townspeople become…

more excited.

Do villagers like the lottery?

The townspeople have mixed reactions to the annual lottery. Some are genuinely excited about it—the children who don’t know any better think it’s an opportunity to play and talk together.

Why is the ending of the lottery so shocking?

Jackson defers the revelation of the lottery’s true purpose until the very end of the story, when “the winner,” Tess Hutchison, is stoned to death by friends and family. This shocking event marks a dramatic turning point in how we understand the story.

What is a little bit ironic or unexpected about Tessie’s final scream?

2,290 answers. Tessie’s final scream in Shirley Jackson’s “The Lottery” is actually rather ironic. The lottery in this untitled town has taken place for years and years. According to the rules of the society, the lottery takes place under extremely fair conditions. One person will be stoned every year.

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Why is Mrs Hutchinson upset in the lottery?

Hutchinson upset? Mrs. Hutchinson is upset when she draws the slip of paper with the black spot because this indicates that she has “won” the lottery, meaning she will become the town’s annual sacrifice.

World of excitement